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      An effort to protect kids from ATV's

      A new federal law aimed at keeping kids safe from lead poisoning is now in effect. It makes it illegal to sell items like ATV's and dirt bikes, to anyone under 12-years old. In the Midlands, a family still looks to get a state law on the books that address safety issues dealing with ATV's and kids. Its known as "Chandler's Law." The bill goes before a house committee for consideration.

      16-year-old Chandler Saylor died in 2003 after an ATV accident. Ever since, his parents have been pushing for more ATV regulation. The House and Senate have passed the bill twice, but Governor Mark Sanford vetoed it both times. Chandler's family is continuing their fight to save others.

      "Chandler was on an ATV and another person was on an ATV," Pamela Saylor said. "An accident happened that day."

      Pamela has turned her pain into a powerful movement. One that could prevent another South Carolina family from having to suffer.

      "The tragedy of it was the loss of our son," Pamela said.

      The accident happened in 2003, the day before Mother's day. It left Pamela and her husband Steven having to bury their son. He was at a friend's house, when the accident happened.

      "What if they don't act responsibly? We feel strongly that a child has a right to be protected," Pamela said.

      Since 2003, the Saylor's have spearheaded efforts for more ATV regulations. But, they've had few results.

      "We've gotten the bill past the House and the Senate twice in 2006 and 2007," Pamela said.

      They want kids ages six to 16, to take free hands-on ATV training class. And also wear mandatory head and eye protection.

      Its hard to understand how a Governor can veto a safety bill for children," Pamela said.

      The Saylor's know these are simple rules that could have a huge impact.

      "We never said it was going to save every child's life, or prevent every injury," Pamela said. "But if it just prevented one injury, or if it prevented one death it's worth the time we have put into it."

      As the Saylor's continue working to get the law passed, they've also set up a scholarship fund in Chandler's name. The award goes to a Swansea graduating senior.