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      Community to Light the night in honor of Richard Culliver

      <font size="2">One day after 9 year-old Richard Culliver lost his battle with brain cancer, the community and people around the country plan to honor the Lexington boy by lighting the night in remberance.</font>

      LEXINGTON (WACH) - One day after Richard Culliver lost his battle with brain cancer, the community and people around the country plan to honor the Lexington boy by lighting the night in remembrance of the 9 year-old.

      More than 1,000 people plan to attend a candle light vigil at the Lexington Town hall fountain at 7 p.m. Monday.

      Followers and supporters from New Jersey to Arizona and as far reaching as Okinawa, Japan say they plan to leave a porch light on in Culliver's honor.

      The funeral arrangements for Culliver were also announced Monday, the viewing will be Tuesday evening at Caughman-Harmon Funeral Home from 6-8 p.m. and the Funeral service for the 9 year-old will be on Wednesday at Saxe Gotha Presbyterian Church at 11 a.m.

      Sunday Morning, Friends followers and supporters learned of young Richard??s death on his personal blog on Facebook that has documented his battle with cancer.

      Post by Richards Journey. Supporters of his family held a yard sale Saturday morning and a concert Sunday afternoon in Lexington to help raise funds for the family and Richard's medical bills.

      Richard suffered from diffuse intrinsic pontine giloma - also known as DIPG, for nearly two years.

      This type of tumor is in the lower part of the brain and effects motor skills, including walking and talking, while leaving your memory intact.

      According to DIPG Registry.org, diffuse intrinsic pontine giloma represents ten to fifteen percent of childhood brain tumors and is the most common cause of death in children with brain tumors.

      Radiotherapy is the standard treatment for DIPG and studies have shown little to no benefit of traditional cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

      Over the past 25 years survival has not improved, with studies showing a less than one year survival rate from the day of diagnosis.