72
      Wednesday
      93 / 73
      Thursday
      93 / 72
      Friday
      94 / 72

      Election director: Dead voter reports not correct

      COLUMBIA, S.C. (WACH, AP) -- South Carolina's Election Commission director says allegations that the dead people have voted in South Carolina elections are not checking out.

      Department of Motor Vehicles Executive Director Kevin Shwedo told a House panel two weeks ago that he had analyzed state voter ID data and found 953 people who voted after their deaths.

      But Election Commission Executive Director Marci Andino told legislators Wednesday that the more than 20 names that have been reviewed so far involve mostly clerical issues like names being crossed off the wrong line on a polling location voting roster, not cases of people looking to misrepresent themselves as a voter who died.

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      Shwedo analyzed more than 230,000 records on people without state driver's licenses or identification cards. He found state Election Commission data included 30,000 dead people. He said the records involving 900 dead people were turned over to SLED to investigate.

      "It was a very easy one to one, here's the date of death from Social Security, here's the date of last vote from the election commission," Shwedo told WACH Fox News earlier this month. "If you voted after that date, you voted during a period of time where you were dead."

      Supporters of a controversial voter ID measure signed into law last spring that would require voters to present a picture ID at the polls say Shwedo's findings prove that the measure is necessary. The law has been blocked by the U.S. Justice Department.

      Despite finding conflicting information, Andino says the allegations are serious and she will continue to look into the details on each of the voters Shwedo questioned.

      Lawmakers have advised both agenices to compare their information to sort out the issue.

      (The Associated Press contributed to this report.)