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      Michigan becoming a 'right-to-work' state could affect South Carolina

      "There really is a big misperception around what Right to Work really means," said Darrell Scott, SC Chamber of Commerce.

      COLUMBIA (WACH) - South Carolina is one of 23 states that currently practices some form of the right-to-work law.

      Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder will decide if Michigan will be the 24th state to adopt the law; a move that could have an impact here in South Carolina.

      The right-to-work law is mostly favored by Republicans. Critics say the law weakens labor bargaining strength, but supporters say it attracts businesses and gives workers more choice.

      "There really is a big misperception around what Right to Work really means," said Darrell Scott, SC Chamber of Commerce. "All it means is that you're not forced; you're not by law required to pay dues to the union."

      A lack of labor unions made South Carolina an attractive choice for aircraft company Boeing when they set up shop in Charleston during a labor dispute in the Pacific Northwest.

      Scott says he doesn't see states that have not competed with South Carolina in the past becoming a threat just yet when it comes to jobs.

      Last week, Snyder promised to sign the right-to-work bill, which could affect jobs in South Carolina in the long term.

      "Michigan's doing this from a stop the bleeding standpoint. We're going to continue to recruit major manufacturers to South Carolina," said Scott.

      Michigan's existing infrastructure of manufacturing plants could make the northern state a bigger player when it comes to attracting companies.

      "Long term, I don't think it has much of an impact to South Carolina. We have so many other great attributes," said Scott.