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      Surprise SC Senate candidate makes first speech

      folks attending Alvin Greene's first speech

      More than 300 people packed the Manning Junior High School to hear U.S. Senate hopeful Alvin Greene's first public speech. Greene, a 32 year-old unemployed veteran won the opportunity to run for the Senate seat when he stunned political experts by winning the democratic primary with 59% of the votes over political favorite Vic Rawl. He is currently facing an obescenity charge.

      But that didn't stop Shirby Dupree from coming to learn more about the U.S. Senate hopeful. She said, "He's different and that's what we need; somebody that wants to make a difference."

      Folks came from all across the state including Columbia and Sumter to hear more about Greene's campaign; most of them curious about who he is and what he's planning to do for the state.

      Bob Artus traveled 25 miles from Sumter to Manning because he's never heard of Greene. "I don't know who the man is so I'm coming to get an education."

      Greene spoke to the crowd for less than 10 minutes. He opened his speech with his most famous line saying, "I am the best candidate for the job."

      Within moments, Alvin Greene, addressed many issues and received lots of applauses.

      "We need better education for our children. We can expand the water and sewer system," said Greene.

      Greene ended his speech with the final thought of, "Let's get South Carolina and America Back to work for the people again."

      Greene's final words were met by a standing ovation but Artus is left with unanswered questions. "He didn't tell me nothing I didn't know already. He didn't tell me how he was going to do it," he said.

      Crystal Hilton, a Manning resident, feels she needs Greene's campaign to be more concrete. "He needs to be a little more firm in what he wants to do and how he plans to get it done," she said.

      Hilton stated she was glad Greene had a little bit more to say and presented it a little more professional than in the past from what she's been able to see and read through media outlets, she als said she's left with too many unanswered questions. "I'm still not sold for actually voting for him," she said.

      Artus said he wanted to hear more from the candidate but he says he's also willing to give him another chance. "I'm open-minded. I'll listen to him. I'll come again and listen to him, I'll even come and talk to him but he didn't tell me anything."