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      Suspect in Vegas Strip shooting has South Carolina ties

      The search has widened to the southeastern U.S. for a 26-year-old man who police call the prime suspect in a shooting and fiery crash that killed three last week on the Las Vegas Strip.

      LAS VEGAS (AP/WACH) -- Police say they have a warrant for the arrest of a 26-year-old ex-convict identified as the prime suspect in a shooting and fiery crash that killed three last week on the Las Vegas Strip.

      Police Capt. Chris Jones told reporters Monday that Ammar Harris faces three murder charges in the Thursday incident that killed the driver of a Maserati and a taxi driver and passenger.

      Public records show Harris lived in South Carolina and Georgia; was convicted in Atlanta in 2005 of marijuana possession; and was arrested in Miami in December on a reckless driving charge.

      An arrest record provided by the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division showed Harris has arrests for drugs and theft. His first arrest in South Carolina was in April 2004 in Orangeburg on possession of a stolen vehicle charges and driving under suspension. Harris was convicted of driving under suspension and sentenced to two years probation.

      The possession of a stolen vehicle charges were dismissed.

      Harris was convicted for selling a pistol illegally in April 2005, his last arrest in South Carolina, while he was on probation for his other conviction.

      Harris was also arrested last year in Las Vegas on pandering, kidnapping, sex assault and coercion charges.

      Harris is accused of firing shots into a Maserati, killing an aspiring rapper, and causing a crash and explosion that killed two people in a taxi at the heart of the Vegas Strip last week.

      District Attorney Steve Wolfson attended an afternoon news conference and afterward said he hoped Harris would surrender.

      Wolfson called the case "of the highest importance," and said prosecutors are already working with police on the case.

      Jones said billboard companies in Las Vegas were donating space to advertise the manhunt.

      (The Associated Press contributed to this report.)